Advertiser Disclosure
Advertiser Disclosure: Our unbiased reviews and content are supported in part by affiliate partnerships, and we adhere to strict guidelines to preserve editorial integrity.

iPad POS Software Reviews

buyers guide
Sort By
  • Lavu Review

    Read Review Compare

    Lavu POS promises to deliver features for all kinds of restaurants, from cafes to pizzerias and even food trucks. Plus, the UI is simple but customizable. But is that enough to earn your business? Read on to find out!

  • TouchBistro Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Elegant, simple design User-friendly Cost-effective Excellent value for small restaurants Cons So-so customer service Functionality is pretty basic without add-ons Overview We’ve all seen morning coffee buyers anxiously standing in line, waiting for the caffeine fix that will carry them through their day. Picture this instead: staff walking the line, taking orders and payment […]

  • Bindo POS Review

    Read Review Compare

    Bindo POS has staked its reputation on its solid eCommerce integration, but not much else sets this iPad POS system apart from its competitors. See whether Bindo might be right for you.

  • Toast POS Review

    Read Review Visit Site

    Pros User-friendly interface Exceptional customer service All-in-one POS Android-based Cons Locked into Toast’s credit card processing Additional cost for add-ons Overview Toast, the brainchild of three former co-workers, Steve Fredette, Aman Narang, and Jonathan Grimm, burst onto the scene after its creation in 2012. After it was named the hottest startup at the 2016 NEVY […]

  • Ambur POS Review

    Read Review Visit Site

    Pros Simple, intuitive design Strong customer service Customizable layout Cons Features are less than robust Weak reporting No integrations Overview: The Ambur restaurant point of sale system was born in Kabab and Curry, a family restaurant in Williamsville, NY. Waiters James O’Leary and Ansar Khan (also a son of the restaurant owners) realized that scrawling […]

  • Bepoz POS Review

    Read Review Compare

    Overview: Bepoz got its start in Australia and has since taken off internationally. In 2004, the company created its own POS which is currently available in eight different countries. Bepoz has some truly outstanding features, particularly on the backend, with one of the most advanced reporting systems imaginable, a host of technological advances, and the […]

  • Cashier Live Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Specific functions for pharmacies Integrated purchase orders Cons Lacks offline functionality Mediocre customer service Reporting is thin Overview: Cashier Live is a 100% cloud-based POS and inventory management SaaS (“software as a service”) that was launched in 2008. It was founded by Tom and Thomas Greenhaw, a father-son duo motivated to provide a low-cost […]

  • Franpos (formerly iConnect) Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Unique features for bookings Simple and strong reporting options Strong customer support Deep and varied feature set Cons The interface can be glitchy Can’t process payments offline Overview Franpos has recently rebranded. Staring as iConnect in 2011, it has established itself as a solid all-in-one system and is particularly useful in the salon world. […]

  • Hike POS Review

    Read Review Compare

    Looking for a terrific, innovative POS system to help run your business? Check out our review of HIke POS to see what they can provide.

  • Instore Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Gift card and loyalty functions Open API Simple to use and operate Cons No purchase order management No supply tracking No accounting integrations Overview: Instore is a point of sale (POS) system developed by Own Group; it has been on the market since 2009. In its earlier days Instore exclusively targeted the restaurant industry, but […]

Overview of iPad Based POS Systems

When the server arrives at the table of your favorite restaurant, she’s carrying an iPad instead of a pen and pad. As the members of your party place their orders, she navigates the touchscreen and sends the order directly to the kitchen from right there at your table. You notice the efficiency of the process and resume conversation with your colleagues.

When it comes time to settle the tab, you hand the server your credit card. Instead of walking away or saying that she’ll be “right back with your receipt”, she completes the entire transaction on the iPad and asks you to sign the touchscreen. Then she offers to email the receipt to you. The entire process saved paper, time, and energy. (If you’ve ever waited tables, you know the value of saving steps whenever you can.)

Scenarios like these have led to the increased popularity of iPad based POS systems among all kinds of retailers. This article will discuss the pros and cons of such systems as well as the costs and hardware requirements necessary for implementation at your business. We also maintain an updated list of our choices for best ipad pos systems if you’re interested.

Pros

  • Easy deployment. You only have to purchase an iPad and download an app.
  • Easy to use. Because touchscreens and iOS are so common, your employees’ learning curve will be minimal. Chances are they already know how to navigate an iPad.
  • Integrations with ancillary software. Most of these iPad based POS systems integrate with other software that works to support business marketing and operations. Such software includes loyalty software, accounting software, booking software, shopping cart software, shipping software, inventory software, and payroll. Older systems usually don’t have these types of integrations.
  • Lower maintenance. Since iPad based POS systems are based in the cloud, all of the updates happen there, too. You don’t have to worry about updating your onsite servers if you don’t use onsite servers.
  • Accessibility. Look over sales reports or inventory from anywhere there’s Internet access. Everything’s on the web so you don’t have to be at work to have the information.
  • Increased mobility. Like the server in the introduction, your employees can be where your customers are. Use the iPad POS at a food truck park or an auto repair shop, a hair salon or a trade show. You’re not tied down to the checkout counter. Anywhere can be the checkout counter.
  • Low upfront costs. For a single user situation, the costs involve an iPad and an app. Obviously, those costs increase when you have to buy more than one iPad.

Cons

  • No offline mode in some cases. While some vendors offer an offline mode, most rely on Internet connectivity to operate properly. So if the Internet is out, you’re out of luck. Of course, that’s the case with most business operations anyway. The Internet is second only to electricity when it comes to business essentials. If either gets knocked out, head to the golf course.
  • Security concerns. Because hackers use their genius for evil rather than good, there is always the risk that business, employee, and customer information can be breached. If it’s accessible to you anywhere there’s an Internet connection, it’s accessible to hackers, too. Many vendors work to encrypt information, but there is still a risk.
  • Monthly fees. You have to pay for the service just like you pay for other merchant services. Everybody’s trying to make money.

Costs

  • Low upfront costs. Depending on how many terminals you want and the hardware your business requires, you can start up for anywhere between $1,000 and $3,500.
  • Monthly fees. Fees vary from vendor to vendor accordingly to the features they offer.
  • Hardware costs. The more hardware you buy, the more it will cost. Think about what you’ll use consistently and what you won’t. The food service industry probably won’t need a barcode scanner.

Implementation and Deployment

  • Easy to deploy. In some cases all you have to do is download and install the app. In other cases, it’s all web-based and you just have to access the Internet.
  • Quick hardware setup. When you buy iPad compatible hardware, it’s just a matter of downloading the required software.

Hardware Requirements

  • To use an iPad POS, you need to have a tablet that is iOS compatible. That means an iPad, an iPad mini, or an iPad touch. These tablets cost anywhere from $200 to $500.
  • Stands and/or mounts. If you’re thinking, “I don’t need a stand. We can just carry the tablet or lay it on the counter,” think again. Stands and mounts protect the iPad from spills, drops, and other travesties that shatter screens or ruin devices.
  • Cash drawer. You want to have somewhere secure to keep cash. You can purchase a cash drawer for $100 to $300.
  • Receipt printer. Not everybody is forthright with their email address. Some people still want hard copies of everything. You can pay anywhere from $300 to $479 for an iPad compatible receipt printer.
  • Barcode scanner. If you plan to use barcodes to keep track of inventory or during purchase, you’ll want a barcode scanner. The camera on the iPad will suffice for infrequent use. Otherwise a scanner will cost you between $170 and $529.
  • Card reader. Most of the iPad POS software packages come with a credit card reader. For those that don’t, expect to shell out as little as $10 or as much as $100.
Share

Our unbiased reviews and content are supported in part by affiliate partnerships, and we adhere to strict guidelines to preserve editorial integrity. The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone.