Advertiser Disclosure
Advertiser Disclosure: Our unbiased reviews and content are supported in part by affiliate partnerships, and we adhere to strict guidelines to preserve editorial integrity.

iPad POS Software Reviews

buyers guide
Sort By
  • Kounta Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Fast payment option for checkout Strong marketing options Reasonable pricing Cons Not particularly intuitive Glitches in the software Overview: Kounta is the flagship POS product offered by a recent start-up (which is also called Kounta). Among the software’s many talking points—and there are many—are its cross-device compatibility (it will work on just about any […]

  • Linga POS

    Read Review Compare

    Looking for a reasonably priced POS system for your restaurant? Linga's iPad-based point of sale may offer all the features you need. Read on for a full review.

  • LivePOS Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Nearly 1000 features Integrates with Shopify Unique employee management features Simple set up Cons Slightly higher cost Mediocre customer service Interface not as intuitive as some competitors Overview: Self-proclaimed the “cloud point of sale system for Chains and Franchises,” LivePOS is a system designed for the retail industry. Back in 2006, LivePOS became the […]

  • NCR Silver Pro Restaurant Edition Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Strong customer service Take-out and delivery functions Built for mobility Cons Lack of integrations Not compatible with certain hardware Overview NCR is a Georgia-based fortune 500 company that has been around for over 130 years. Currently, NCR’s products are used to make nearly 650 million transactions every day. Though known best for its retail-oriented […]

  • NCR Silver Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Continually updating features Sleek and simple interface Excellent inventory management Strong marketing options Cons Hidden costs Basic reporting functions are limited Overview: NCR Silver is a cloud-based iPad POS system made by the first point-of-sale company in the world, 130-years-old electronics giant NCR Corporation. This software sets itself apart in a handful of ways […]

  • Nobly POS Review

    Read Review Visit Site

    Pros Ease of Use Affordability Simple set up Easy to reach customer service Cons Slightly clunky back office Overview Founded in 2013 in London, England, Nobly hasn’t taken long to rise through the ranks in the iPad point of sale industry. The company specializes in the hospitality industry, gearing its product toward smaller, independent businesses. […]

  • Quetzal Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Great reporting functions No contracts Customized for small clothing retailers Highly affordable Cons No QuickBooks integration Extra cost for advanced support Overview What is a Quetzal? Wikipedia—the greatest source of reliable information since August 6th, 1991—tells me it’s a “strikingly colored bird in the Trogon family.” Though I’m not entirely sure what an Ontario-based […]

  • Quickbooks Cloud POS Review

    Read Review Visit Site

    Everyone’s been asking about the latest point of sale platform from Intuit: QuickBooks Cloud POS. Normally, we’d go through the ins and outs of the software, testing it and reporting on what works and what doesn’t, but it turns out we’d be repeating ourselves if we did. As advertised on the QuickBooks website, the company’s latest […]

  • Rezku POS Review

    Read Review Compare

    Rezku POS is a relative newcomer on the POS market. Launched in 2014 in Sacramento, California, it features a sleek and modern interface that is extremely easy to navigate and learn. Rezku (the company swears it's pronounced exactly like "rescue") is designed specifically with restaurants in mind and has some terrific features that make it an extremely appealing candidate.

  • Ring It Up Review

    Read Review Compare

    Pros Extremely cost efficient Depth of features Allows for easy importing Product is highly mobile Cons Recent dip in customer service Can’t create advanced product modifiers Overview: Despite its incredibly low price, Ring It Up is a powerful, versatile, and mobile point of sale that can be an invaluable resource for virtually any type of […]

Overview of iPad Based POS Systems

When the server arrives at the table of your favorite restaurant, she’s carrying an iPad instead of a pen and pad. As the members of your party place their orders, she navigates the touchscreen and sends the order directly to the kitchen from right there at your table. You notice the efficiency of the process and resume conversation with your colleagues.

When it comes time to settle the tab, you hand the server your credit card. Instead of walking away or saying that she’ll be “right back with your receipt”, she completes the entire transaction on the iPad and asks you to sign the touchscreen. Then she offers to email the receipt to you. The entire process saved paper, time, and energy. (If you’ve ever waited tables, you know the value of saving steps whenever you can.)

Scenarios like these have led to the increased popularity of iPad based POS systems among all kinds of retailers. This article will discuss the pros and cons of such systems as well as the costs and hardware requirements necessary for implementation at your business. We also maintain an updated list of our choices for best ipad pos systems if you’re interested.

Pros

  • Easy deployment. You only have to purchase an iPad and download an app.
  • Easy to use. Because touchscreens and iOS are so common, your employees’ learning curve will be minimal. Chances are they already know how to navigate an iPad.
  • Integrations with ancillary software. Most of these iPad based POS systems integrate with other software that works to support business marketing and operations. Such software includes loyalty software, accounting software, booking software, shopping cart software, shipping software, inventory software, and payroll. Older systems usually don’t have these types of integrations.
  • Lower maintenance. Since iPad based POS systems are based in the cloud, all of the updates happen there, too. You don’t have to worry about updating your onsite servers if you don’t use onsite servers.
  • Accessibility. Look over sales reports or inventory from anywhere there’s Internet access. Everything’s on the web so you don’t have to be at work to have the information.
  • Increased mobility. Like the server in the introduction, your employees can be where your customers are. Use the iPad POS at a food truck park or an auto repair shop, a hair salon or a trade show. You’re not tied down to the checkout counter. Anywhere can be the checkout counter.
  • Low upfront costs. For a single user situation, the costs involve an iPad and an app. Obviously, those costs increase when you have to buy more than one iPad.

Cons

  • No offline mode in some cases. While some vendors offer an offline mode, most rely on Internet connectivity to operate properly. So if the Internet is out, you’re out of luck. Of course, that’s the case with most business operations anyway. The Internet is second only to electricity when it comes to business essentials. If either gets knocked out, head to the golf course.
  • Security concerns. Because hackers use their genius for evil rather than good, there is always the risk that business, employee, and customer information can be breached. If it’s accessible to you anywhere there’s an Internet connection, it’s accessible to hackers, too. Many vendors work to encrypt information, but there is still a risk.
  • Monthly fees. You have to pay for the service just like you pay for other merchant services. Everybody’s trying to make money.

Costs

  • Low upfront costs. Depending on how many terminals you want and the hardware your business requires, you can start up for anywhere between $1,000 and $3,500.
  • Monthly fees. Fees vary from vendor to vendor accordingly to the features they offer.
  • Hardware costs. The more hardware you buy, the more it will cost. Think about what you’ll use consistently and what you won’t. The food service industry probably won’t need a barcode scanner.

Implementation and Deployment

  • Easy to deploy. In some cases all you have to do is download and install the app. In other cases, it’s all web-based and you just have to access the Internet.
  • Quick hardware setup. When you buy iPad compatible hardware, it’s just a matter of downloading the required software.

Hardware Requirements

  • To use an iPad POS, you need to have a tablet that is iOS compatible. That means an iPad, an iPad mini, or an iPad touch. These tablets cost anywhere from $200 to $500.
  • Stands and/or mounts. If you’re thinking, “I don’t need a stand. We can just carry the tablet or lay it on the counter,” think again. Stands and mounts protect the iPad from spills, drops, and other travesties that shatter screens or ruin devices.
  • Cash drawer. You want to have somewhere secure to keep cash. You can purchase a cash drawer for $100 to $300.
  • Receipt printer. Not everybody is forthright with their email address. Some people still want hard copies of everything. You can pay anywhere from $300 to $479 for an iPad compatible receipt printer.
  • Barcode scanner. If you plan to use barcodes to keep track of inventory or during purchase, you’ll want a barcode scanner. The camera on the iPad will suffice for infrequent use. Otherwise a scanner will cost you between $170 and $529.
  • Card reader. Most of the iPad POS software packages come with a credit card reader. For those that don’t, expect to shell out as little as $10 or as much as $100.
Share

Our unbiased reviews and content are supported in part by affiliate partnerships, and we adhere to strict guidelines to preserve editorial integrity. The editorial content on this page is not provided by any of the companies mentioned and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone.