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A Guide To Using Personal Credit Cards For Business Expenses

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Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer and cereal chef from San Diego. He graduated with a Political Science degree from San Diego State University in 2001. He's been writing about website builders, crowdfunding sites, online lenders, and credit cards for Merchant Maverick since 2015. Additionally, Jason can't eat raisins.
Jason Vissers
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11 Comments

Responses are not provided or commissioned by the vendor or bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the vendor or bank advertiser. It is not the vendor or bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

    Craig Pierce

    After searching several sites, I have found no mention on whether or not a personal credit card used for both business and personal purchases has an annual fee which can be deducted for tax purposes. While the card is essential for business purchases; it is extremely convenient to also use the card for personal purchases too.

    Also, if I am carrying a balance, conceptually speaking, shouldn’t I be allowed to deduct some of that interest since it it partially being charged for business purchases?

      This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

      Jessica Dinsmore

      Hi Craig,

      While a business credit card’s annual fee is tax deductible, a personal card’s annual fee is not tax-deductible. As for the card’s interest being tax deductible, that would be really complex to do for a personal card that’s being partially used for business because you’d have to calculate the share of the overall interest payments that’s going towards the business purchases. You’d likely need professional help with that!

        This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

        Edward Roy

        If you put business expenses on your personal card and thereby earn airline or hotel points, or even cashback rewards, on your personal card (but are being reimbursed for these expenses by the business) is the value of those points/rewards considered taxable income/compensation to the employee? I think the answer is No though it might be a loophole in the system. But wanted to make sure.

          This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

          Jessica Dinsmore

          Hi Edward,

          This isn’t something we are too familiar with, so we can’t say for sure. However, after running a very brief search, based on our limited search results, it appears that the rewards in this instance would likely not be considered taxable income.

            This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

            Jenn

            I have a question..
            Am I to pass those rewards I earn from legitimate business purchases onto the business?
            For instance:
            I earn 3% cashback on fuel purchases. Can I keep that 3% for myself & have my company reimburse me to fuel up the company vehicle..or..am I to give that 3% to the business?

              This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

              Jessica Dinsmore

              Hi Jenn,

              This isn’t something we know too much about, but we did a little digging around and found that in your scenario, it appears that you could keep your rewards.

                This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

                Jordan

                In order to make the monthly payments of my personal card from my business account. Do I need to reimburse myself as an employee through PAYE or can I make the payments directly from my business account to my personal credit card?

                  This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

                  Jessica Dinsmore

                  Hi Jordan,

                  This is a bit outside our expertise. I’d recommend consulting a tax professional familiar with how PAYE works in your area, as it appears it is specific to the UK/Australia.

                    This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

                    Mfc

                    Thanks for sharing. However, it soars another question. Is it ethical for the CEO or BOD of a 501(C)3 to request company bills be paid through his personal credit card specially to earn reward points and the company reimburse his credit card bill? When the company had the funds to pay the bills originally?

                      This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

                      Jessica Dinsmore

                      Hi Mfc,

                      This isn’t something we’ve encountered before, so we don’t want to give any advice we aren’t qualified to give. However, after doing some quick research, it seems 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations can run into trouble with their tax-exempt status if they operate in this way.

                        This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

                        mdrakib

                        wow very nice and helpful article,i think this blog is very helpful for everyone and me.
                        i got many information from here.thanks a lot for sharing this post. good job keep it up.

                          This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

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