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The Best Payment Gateways For Online Payment Processing

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Building an eCommerce business involves making a lot of choices. One crucial decision you might have overlooked is choosing the best payment gateway to allow your customers to make purchases on your site. Pick a good gateway, and you’ll be able to accept just about any payment method imaginable, interface with the online shopping cart of your choice, and, perhaps most importantly, easily be able to migrate your customer payment data to a different system if you later decide to change gateway providers.

If you pick a not-so-great gateway, you may someday find yourself with a product that no longer meets the needs of your business — and no easy way to switch to a better one.

If you’re new to eCommerce, your first question might be, “Just what the heck is a payment gateway, anyway?” We’ll refer you to our payment gateway explainer article for a more detailed answer to this question. For now, here’s the ultra-simplified version: A payment gateway is a merchant service that provides the link between your eCommerce site and the payment processor that receives your customer’s payment, securely shuttling this sensitive data between the two.

We've done in-depth research on each and confidently recommend them.

Very briefly, I’ll touch on the three different payment gateway setups you can have. You can find a merchant account provider that includes its proprietary gateway, as is the case with PayJunction, or partners with another company to offer a gateway as part of its regular service plan. Alternately, you can use a payment service provider (PSP), such as Stripe or PayPal, which offers a built-in payment gateway along with what is, essentially, one big collective merchant account for all its merchants. But wait! There’s a third option: you can find a merchant account provider with no gateway included and then sign up with a stand-alone gateway on your own, such as Authorize.Net. In this instance, your preferred payment gateway will still need to be compatible with your merchant account provider.

In this piece, we’re going to recommend our top payment gateways. But first, let’s discuss the features you should watch for when choosing a payment gateway.

Learn More About Our Top Picks

CompanySummaryNext Steps
Initially founded in 1996, Authorize.Net is one of the oldest and most experienced payment gateway providers in the industry. Thanks to partnerships with a host of merchant account providers, it has also cornered the lion’s share of the market for payment gateways.

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One of the top traditional merchant account providers around, PayJunction provides a laundry list of payment services particularly well-suited to tech-driven businesses and online retailers of all types.

Visit Site

Read More

Square's free online store is somewhat limited and best suited to small businesses. However, you can upgrade to paid plans and get access to more of the features Weebly (and Square) offers for merchants.

Visit Site

Read More

You might not think of PayPal as a payment gateway provider, but the company's Payflow Payment Gateway is a very capable product. In fact, PayPal offers a host of merchant services for eCommerce businesses.

Read More

For small businesses, this is a very affordable approach, as there’s no separate account setup fee, no monthly gateway fees, and no additional per-transaction processing fee.

Read More

Other Featured Options:

  • Amazon Pay: Amazon Pay is an online-only third-party processor through which customers can make purchases, give donations, and set up recurring payments on a merchant’s website by making payments through their Amazon.com account.

Read more below to learn why we chose these options.

What Features To Look For In A Payment Gateway

Most of the major gateways have a lot in common in terms of their core features. However, there are still ways to distinguish different providers in terms of the services and value they offer.

Supported Payment Types & Currencies

When you’re running an online store, you want to be able to accept payment a) from the greatest number of people globally as possible, and b) using the widest possible variety of payment methods. For example, almost every gateway on the market will support Visa and Mastercard credit card purchases. Support for less-common cards isn’t as easy to find. You might also want to consider supporting ACH or payments from mobile wallets (e.g., Apple Pay On the Web).

With eCommerce, it’s all about making sure nothing stands in the way of you accepting a potential customer’s business. Otherwise, you’re just leaving money on the table.

It’s a good idea to use site analytics to determine where visitors to your online store are coming from. As consumers from different countries tend to prefer using different methods of payment, you’ll need a gateway that both accepts the currencies your customers use as well as the payment methods preferred by said customers if you plan to cater to an international crowd.

Security

No eCommerce merchant ever wants to have their site hacked, and their customer’s sensitive payment data exposed in a data breach. Your gateway provider doesn’t want this to happen, either, which is why every gateway on the market comes with security and encryption features to keep your account safe.

Some of these features, however, are more effective than others. Look for point-to-point encryption (P2PE) and a gateway that meets Level 1 PCI compliance standards. Other features, such as data breach insurance, are also useful to have. You should also consider looking for features such as AVS checks, CVV checks, and even 3d Secure.

Data Portability

Some payment gateways (I’m casting side-eye at PayPal and Authorize.Net here) lock in your customers’ payment information. That prevents you from taking your customers’ credit card data with you in the event you switch payment gateway providers. That isn’t good for you as a merchant, as it forces you to choose between maintaining your current gateway provider indefinitely and losing all that valuable information. That’s why data portability is a feature many merchants look for in a payment gateway.

If yours is a subscription-based business, data portability is of singular importance. If you drop your current payment gateway and your gateway doesn’t offer data portability, you’ll be left unable to bill your subscribers.

APIs & Developer Tools

Payment gateways offering developer tools such as APIs give you the ability to implement a high degree of customization to make the service work with your business. However, you’ll likely need to either hire a developer or possess developer skills yourself to implement these tools.

APIs can help you track inventory, manage customer data, and more. This is a case where paying less for a bare-bones gateway provider can end up costing you more in the long run. Paying more for a payment gateway that includes developer tools/APIs can end up helping your bottom line by making your online store more efficient.

Contracts

Most payment gateway providers bill you monthly, with no long-term contract and no early termination fee (ETF) if you close your account. However, your merchant account provider might include both of these provisions, so read all your contract documents carefully before signing up. It won’t do you much good to be able to drop your payment gateway whenever you want if you’re stuck in a three-year contract for your merchant account.

If you don’t like the idea of even a monthly contract, some providers (such as PayPal) allow you to use their services without any contract.

Customer Support

Like any other software product, payment gateways are prone to occasional hiccups and glitches — often at the most inconvenient times. The eCommerce world runs around the clock, rendering the idea of “regular business hours” obsolete. For this reason, you’ll want a gateway backed by 24/7 customer support.

While options such as email and online chat are handy, you really should be able to talk to a customer service representative on the phone when a problem arises.

Payment Gateway Costs

While everyone wants to save money, we firmly believe that pricing should be evaluated in terms of overall value rather than merely trying to find the cheapest option available. Trying to save a few bucks can easily result in being stuck with a product that doesn’t fully meet your needs. That said, there are some things to look out for.

For example, many gateway providers charge a gateway setup fee when you first open your account. While this is a one-time charge, it’s mostly a junk fee that you should avoid paying. You’re more likely to get hit with a setup fee if you sign up directly with a gateway provider. Merchant account providers often waive this fee if you get your gateway through them.

Monthly gateway fees (usually around $15-$25 per month), on the other hand, are tough to avoid. Unless you sign up with a company that doesn’t charge a monthly fee for gateway services, such as CDGcommerce or Payment Depot, you can expect to pay this on top of whatever monthly fee you have to pay for your merchant account.

Gateway processing charges (typically $0.05-$0.10 per transaction) are another thing to look out for. Some companies will charge you separately for this, while others will include it in their processing rates.

You might also have to pay PCI compliance fees, particularly if you’ve signed up directly with a gateway provider. Usually, however, these fees are included in your merchant account pricing.

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1. Authorize.Net

Authorize.Net



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Initially founded in 1996, Authorize.Net is one of the oldest and most experienced payment gateway providers in the industry. Thanks to partnerships with a host of merchant account providers, it has also cornered the lion’s share of the market for payment gateways. The majority of merchant account providers (including Payment Depot) offer Authorize.Net as one of their payment gateway options.

Does being the biggest gateway provider also make them the best? Possibly. With over twenty years in business, it’s managed to add a lot of bells and whistles to its core product. Its gateway can accept all major credit cards, debit cards, echeck (ACH) payments, and even digital payment methods, such as PayPal and Apple Pay.

Authorize.Net accepts international transactions from just about any country in the world, although your business must be based in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Europe, or Australia. Its Advanced Fraud Detection Suite (AFDS) can protect your site from card-not-present fraud — a common issue with eCommerce. Best of all, its gateway seamlessly integrates with a vast number of third-party eCommerce platforms.

Sounds great, doesn’t it? Well, there are a few things to watch out for. Pricing can be on the high side if you sign up directly with Authorize.Net, with a $49 gateway setup fee, a $25 monthly gateway fee, and a $25 fee for chargebacks. If you already have a merchant account, you’ll still pay an additional $0.10 per transaction for the use of its gateway. International transactions also pay an additional 1.5% for processing.

If you don’t have a merchant account, Authorize.Net will set you up with one, but it uses a flat-rate pricing plan of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. While this is the same as what you’d pay for PayPal or most other payment service providers (PSPs), you can get lower rates by signing up with a merchant account provider that offers interchange-plus pricing.

The good news is that you can usually get a better deal on the Authorize.Net gateway by signing up with a partner merchant account provider. Most providers will waive the setup fee, and they’ll often charge a lower monthly gateway fee and per-transaction processing fee (typically $0.05 per transaction).

However, Authorize.Net does have one major weakness: data portability. Or, rather, the lack of it. Its Customer Information Manager (CIM) is a powerful feature that allows you to store customer data, including credit card numbers, securely. Unfortunately, it’s difficult and costly to download that data and take it with you if you ever decide to switch to a competing payment gateway — an unfortunate limitation.

Pros

  • Broad support for multiple payment methods and currencies
  • Strong security and fraud prevention features
  • Month-to-month billing with no long-term contracts

Cons

  • Pricing is expensive for merchants who sign up with the company directly
  • High flat-rate pricing for the optional merchant account
  • Data portability is unusually difficult and expensive

For a more in-depth look at Authorize.Net, check out our full review.

Get Started with Authorize.Net

Read our in-depth review

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2. PayJunction

PayJunction



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We here at Merchant Maverick have long been big fans of PayJunction. One of the top traditional merchant account providers around, PayJunction provides a laundry list of payment services particularly well-suited to tech-driven businesses and online retailers of all types.

From CC processing, ACH echeck processing, smart terminals, mobile processing, one-click refunds, a “full-stack” API for developers, remote signature capture and paperless receipts (paper receipts are so last century), and much more, there’s little that PayJunction doesn’t do on the merchant services front.

Included in these services is PayJunction’s proprietary gateway, once branded as Trinity Gateway. PayJunction’s gateway provides access to an all-purpose virtual terminal (compatible with a USB card reader, making it a functional POS). It also includes recurring billing and customer info vault features. It amounts to a solid browser-based check and credit card processing system for both card-present and card-not-present sales, with no credit card machine or paper filing required.

PayJunction uses transparent interchange-plus pricing — Merchant Maverick’s preferred pricing model. You won’t be subject to monthly fees, gateway fees, PCI-compliance fees, or anything of the sort. However, if you process under $10K monthly, a $35 monthly fee will apply. PayJunction’s pricing details are as follows:

  • Cards: Interchange + 0.75%, no per-transaction markup
  • Checks: 0.75%, no per-transaction markup
  • Monthly: No additional charge, or $35 for businesses doing under $10K monthly
  • Annual: No additional charge
  • PCI: No additional charge
  • Gateway: No additional charge

Keep in mind, however, that if you have a processing history, PayJunction will match or beat your current rates, so you’ll never end up paying more for merchant services by switching to PayJunction. For low-volume merchants and new businesses with no processing history, PayJunction may be more than you need. A PSP of the PayPal/Stripe/Square variety may be more suitable. However, for more mature online businesses, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a more versatile and robust merchant account and gateway provider than PayJunction.

Pros

  • Transparent cost-plus pricing
  • Month-to-month agreement
  • ACH payment processing offered
  • Highly-rated customer service with remote support

Cons

  • Not global-friendly
  • A monthly fee for lower-volume merchants

To learn more about why we’re so big on PayJunction, read our full PayJunction review.

Get Started with PayJunction

Read our in-depth review

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3. Square

Square Online Store and eCommerce



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Founded in 2009 by founder & CEO Jack Dorsey (also the founder & CEO of Twitter), Square is amongst the three most well-known PSPs around (along with Stripe and PayPal). However, Square offers up an even broader range of payment solutions than Paypal or Stripe. Beginning with its iconic Square Reader device — one of the first smart mPOS devices ever released — Square has broadened its scope to offer a wide array of merchant services. Those services include a free online store (powered by Weebly), eCommerce integrations with major shopping carts, developer tools for custom eCommerce integrations, and, of course, a built-in payment gateway.

Looking at Square from an eCommerce perspective, online and in-app transactions process at a flat rate of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. Sound familiar? That’s the same rate charged by PayPal and Stripe. Square does not impose setup fees, PCI compliance fees, or other fees associated with some merchant services providers.

Square’s free online store is somewhat limited and best suited to small businesses. However, you can upgrade to paid plans and get access to more of the features Weebly (and Square) offers for merchants.

And while this isn’t the focus of this article, Square offers much better in-person POS solutions for brick-and-mortar businesses than do PayPal or Stripe. After all, Square cut its teeth with those nifty little square-shaped CC readers back when such a thing was to be marveled at, so meatspace retail will always be close to Square’s heart. If you plan to sell online, in-person, and anywhere else that will let you hawk your wares, Square is a great system to do that.

Of course, the drawbacks associated with other PSPs are present with Square. Funding holds, account freezes, and account terminations happen much more frequently than with traditional merchant account providers. However, both Square and Weebly offer phone support for their customers, and Square has rather exceptional self-help resources.

Pros

  • A simple, transparent flat-rate pricing structure
  • No long-term contracts or early termination fees
  • Weebly eCommerce integration
  • Phone support

Cons

  • Flat-rate pricing is more expensive than interchange-plus for high-volume merchants
  • No support for ACH
  • Elevated risk of account holds and terminations

To learn more about Square, check out our full Square review.

Get Started with Square Online Store and eCommerce

Read our in-depth review

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4. PayPal

PayPal



Read our Review

You might not think of PayPal as a payment gateway provider, but the company’s Payflow Payment Gateway is a very capable product. In fact, PayPal offers a host of merchant services for eCommerce businesses, and you can integrate most of them with the merchant account, shopping cart, or another service you’re already using.

Offering PayPal as a backup payment method is the simplest option, as it’s free to set up, and there are no monthly fees or long-term contracts. Pricing is pay-as-you-go and based on a flat rate of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction (4.4% + $0.30 per transaction for international transactions). While this is certainly the least expensive option, realize that as a PSP, PayPal is not giving you a full merchant account. Instead, your account is aggregated with those of other sellers so that you won’t have a unique merchant ID number for your business.

The downsides to this arrangement are that your account won’t be nearly as stable as a merchant account, plus account freezes and holds on your funds are more common. PayPal is somewhat notorious for withholding seller’s funds at the slightest suspicion of fraud. It’s not certain that you’ll encounter a hold — but it’s certainly a possibility, and one you need to consider.

If you already have a merchant account through a different provider, the Payflow Payment Gateway is designed to integrate with it and expand your payment options. PayPal has two gateway pricing plans: Payflow Link and Payflow Pro. The best choice for most merchants is Payflow Link. With no gateway setup or monthly fees, it’s practically free. You pay an extra $0.10 per transaction, and that’s it. You can use a PayPal-hosted payment page or a template embedded on your website.

Payflow Pro, on the other hand, offers full customization and additional PCI compliance features. However, it’s rather expensive, with a $99 setup fee and a $25 monthly fee after that. You’ll also still pay $0.10 per transaction with this option.

So why are we grouping PayPal and Braintree under one heading here? Well, PayPal and Braintree have become so closely linked with features and SDKs that we can treat them as one product in payment gateway terms. However, it’s still important to note that while PayPal is a payment service provider (PSP), Braintree is a traditional merchant account provider.

Braintree Payment Solutions



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Founded in 2010, Braintree Payments Solutions was acquired by PayPal in 2013. It offers an integrated approach to eCommerce, with each account including both a payment gateway and a full-service merchant account. It’s available to merchants in the United States, Canada, Australia, Europe, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and New Zealand. Payments can be accepted in over 130 currencies, including Bitcoin, if you’re feeling adventurous.

Braintree will convert and deposit funds in USD for a 1% fee — a lower fee for currency conversion than you’ll find with many competitors.

Standard accounts at Braintree follow a pay-as-you-go pricing model, with no account setup fees, monthly fees, or even gateway fees. As with PayPal itself, all transactions process at a flat rate of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. Billing is on a month-to-month basis, with no long-term contracts or early termination fees (again, just like PayPal proper). While the flat-rate pricing is not particularly cost-effective for larger businesses, the lack of monthly fees makes it a great deal for smaller companies. Braintree addresses this limitation by offering enterprise pricing for larger businesses (presumably with interchange-plus rates), but you’ll have to process over $80,000 per month to qualify for it.

Braintree’s gateway includes some excellent standard features, including its Drop-In UI for customer checkouts and support for recurring billing. It’s also compatible with a wide variety of third-party integrations, including shopping carts, accounting software, and analytics. Developers can further customize the gateway using Braintree’s client and server SDKs, so you can scale your gateway along with your business.

Perhaps the best feature Braintree has to offer is that it provides complete data portability for free. If your needs change and you want to switch to a different provider, you’re free to take your customer data with you.

While Braintree offers an excellent service at a fair price, it’s not for everyone. If you already have a separate merchant account (particularly if you’re stuck in a long-term contract), its gateway-only option is quite expensive at $49 per month and $0.10 per transaction processed over the gateway. There’s also almost no support for card-present (i.e., retail) transactions, although it does support a handful of third-party mPOS solutions.

Pros

  • Pay-as-you-go pricing with no monthly fees (Payflow Link and Braintree)
  • Simple flat-rate pricing for standard accounts
  • Easy to set up and begin accepting payments
  • Free, unrestricted data portability (Braintree only)

Cons

  • Flat-rate processing charges are higher than most merchant accounts offer
  • No echeck (ACH) payment support with PayPal
  • Braintree’s gateway-only option is expensive
  • Elevated risk of account holds, freezes, and terminations with Paypal

Check out our full PayPal review and our full review of Braintree for more information.

Read our in-depth review

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5. Stripe Payments

Stripe Payments



Read our Review

Much like Braintree, Stripe Payments is a tech-focused merchant services provider that specializes in serving the eCommerce community. Those services are tightly integrated into Stripe’s payments system, so the company doesn’t offer a discrete Stripe-branded payment gateway. Instead, it’s built into the overall payments platform and comes with every Stripe account.

For small businesses, this is a very affordable approach, as there’s no separate account setup fee, no monthly gateway fees, and no additional per-transaction processing fee. You also don’t have to worry about trying to integrate two or more third-party services into your website. Another advantage is that Stripe includes several additional features for free that most gateway providers charge extra for, including echeck (ACH) processing and recurring billing.

We love the simplicity of Stripe’s pricing. Credit card transactions process at a single flat rate of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. eChecks are 0.8%, up to a maximum of $5. Chargebacks incur a $15 fee. Stripe also supports digital payment methods, such as Bitcoin and Apple Pay. Like most of its direct competitors, Stripe bills month-to-month only and doesn’t impose long-term contracts or early termination fees.

Sounds great, doesn’t it? If you think that there must be a catch — of course there is. Stripe is a payment service provider (PSP), so it doesn’t provide true full-service merchant accounts. Like other PSPs (e.g., Square or PayPal), funding holds and account freezes or terminations are distressingly common.

The best thing about Stripe is that it’s designed specifically for eCommerce merchants. Most providers are more focused on the retail sector, and their support for eCommerce always comes at a higher cost in the form of gateway fees and additional per-transaction charges. With Stripe, new eCommerce merchants get everything they need to start accepting payments as soon as their account is approved.

While a Stripe account covers all the basics, you can also add or customize features through its vast API library or supported third-party integrations. Stripe also supports data portability, so you can easily take your customer information with you if you decide to change providers later.

Pros

  • Pay-as-you-go pricing with no setup or monthly fees
  • A simple, transparent flat-rate pricing structure
  • No long-term contracts or early termination fees
  • Huge API library for developers

Cons

  • Flat-rate pricing is more expensive than interchange-plus for high-volume merchants
  • Elevated risk of account holds and terminations

For more information, see our complete review of Stripe Payments.

Read our in-depth review

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6. Amazon Pay

Amazon Pay



Read our Review

Amazon Pay is an online-only third-party processor through which customers can make purchases, give donations, and set up recurring payments on a merchant’s website by making payments through their Amazon.com account. Amazon Pay has a lot to offer both sellers with Amazon and merchants not associated with the company. It features streamlined integration with merchant websites, inline checkout, and access to Amazon Seller Central, Amazon’s dashboard, from which you can manage chargeback claims, view reports, and more.

Amazon Pay’s pricing structure is quite simple and straightforward:

  • 2.9% processing fee + $0.30 authorization fee per transaction (for domestic US transactions)
  • 3.9% processing fee + $0.30 authorization fee per transaction (for cross-border transactions)

There are no contracts to sign, no account setup fees, no monthly fees, no PCI compliance fees, nor any other fees to speak of. We like the fact that you can select from 29 pre-built shopping cart integrations, including Shopify.

A few caveats to note: Your bank account must be associated with your Seller Central account to receive funds from Amazon Pay. Also, you’ll have to wait a bit longer than usual to receive your funds. Amazon uses a reserve system, so when you first begin processing payments, Amazon holds all of your initial transactions in reserve for 14 days. Subsequently, Amazon holds funds for seven days, and there is disbursement scheduled for every day. So, for example, on your 17th day of selling, you will receive payment for purchases made on your ninth day of selling. Chargebacks will cost you a $20 disputed transaction fee plus tax.

Overall, you’ll be paying about the same amount that you would for PayPal as you will with Amazon Pay. Of course, Amazon Pay comes with all the drawbacks of a PSP: funding holds, account freezes/terminations, etc.

Customer support is available via email, phone, and live chat.

Pros

  • No contracts — pay as you go
  • Great for sellers with Amazon
  • Brand recognition

Cons

  • Risk of account holds, terminations, and withheld funds
  • No brick-and-mortar payment support

Read our in-depth review

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Which Payment Gateway Is Right For You?

One way to approach choosing a payment gateway is to take a close look at what your business needs are today and consider how those needs might expand as your business grows. For example, if you don’t need recurring billing, there’s no reason to pay extra for it. If your needs change later, you can always add it to your service.

You’ll also want to put some thought into whether the integrated or non-integrated approach will work best for you. Payment service providers (PSPs), such as PayPal or Stripe, are an excellent way to add credit card processing to your business without spending any money upfront. However, once your business grows large enough, the high flat-rate pricing will end up costing you more money than you’d pay with a traditional merchant account offering interchange-plus pricing. Since there’s no long-term contract to worry about, it’s relatively easy to make the switch once this happens.

We've done in-depth research on each and confidently recommend them.

A Last Look At Our Top Picks

  1. Authorize.Net
    Summary - Initially founded in 1996, Authorize.Net is one of the oldest and most experienced payment gateway providers in the industry. Thanks to partnerships with a host of merchant account providers, it has also cornered the lion’s share of the market for payment gateways.
  2. PayJunction
    Summary - One of the top traditional merchant account providers around, PayJunction provides a laundry list of payment services particularly well-suited to tech-driven businesses and online retailers of all types.
  3. Square Online Store and eCommerce
    Summary - Square's free online store is somewhat limited and best suited to small businesses. However, you can upgrade to paid plans and get access to more of the features Weebly (and Square) offers for merchants.
  4. PayPal
    Summary - You might not think of PayPal as a payment gateway provider, but the company's Payflow Payment Gateway is a very capable product. In fact, PayPal offers a host of merchant services for eCommerce businesses.
  5. Stripe Payments
    Summary - For small businesses, this is a very affordable approach, as there’s no separate account setup fee, no monthly gateway fees, and no additional per-transaction processing fee.
  6. Amazon Pay
    Summary - Amazon Pay is an online-only third-party processor through which customers can make purchases, give donations, and set up recurring payments on a merchant’s website by making payments through their Amazon.com account.
Frank Kehl

Frank Kehl

Frank Kehl has been writing about merchant services, payment gateways, and international money transfer services since 2015. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Penn State and a Juris Doctorate from the Ventura College of Law. After a long and enjoyable career of traveling around the world as an Air Force navigator, he’s comfortably settled down in the wine country town of Paso Robles in California’s scenic Central Coast region. He enjoys reading, photography, hiking, and numerous other outdoor pursuits.
Frank Kehl
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3 Comments

Responses are not provided or commissioned by the vendor or bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the vendor or bank advertiser. It is not the vendor or bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

    Anubhav Sharma

    Thanks for sharing such information as it was very much helpful. These online payment gateways are the safest payment gateways for online transactions. Keep Sharing such blogs.

      This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

      digvijay

      After reading your blog post, I found it very informative. You have shared great list of Payment Gateways In India.

        This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

        Lina

        I think it’s also worth mentioning payment gateway providers such as 2checkout or G2A PAY. The latter is my choice for my webshop because as you mentioned my plans were to expand to different regions and thus I had the need to offer more local payment methods popular for any given regions (Paytm for India for example). What drag me first to G2A PAY was actually the fast integration process which is free, fast and does not require any coding knowledge..

          This comment refers to an earlier version of this post and may be outdated.

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